Tapping on horseback for their own peak performance empowered a group of young amateur equestrians in Texas recently.

EFT practitioner Ange Dickson-Finn had only a brief time to instruct an all-female group of riders of varying skill preparing for a competition.

After a 15-minute introduction to EFT tapping, she then taught the group basic mechanical EFT only, aimed at aiding specific skill problems rather than directly for nervousness. She taught them the safe way to tap away a problem while mounted.

Stubborn horse
One teenager on a stubborn horse said she could not keep her horse from trying to trot to the centre of the arena instead of following the fence around.  Ange used this difficulty to show the group how to tap:  ‘Even though I can’t keep Blue from diving in and that makes me frustrated, I’m a great rider.’
Soon this rider was having no trouble with Blue, and also she felt relaxed.

Riders’ bonus
Ange said,  ‘An added bonus for riders is that horses look for coherence in humans. That is, when biological systems such as brainwaves and heart rhythms become regular and synchronised.

‘This gives a focussed and relaxed energy that the horse, a prey animal expert at picking up on energy states, responds to.
‘The horse can then also relax and access its own skills, and the team of horse and rider reinforces one another positively.’

Judge: ‘Group improvement’
A few days later Ange attended the competition, assisting competitors with EFT.

Each of the EFT rounds that riders had fun using focussed on their individual performance problems, and each took less than five minutes. As other team members were tapping, competitors felt comfortable tapping openly.

At the end of the day the judge commented:  ‘To see a consistent pattern of improvement among a group of riders of different ages is rare, and a significant outcome.’

Ange said, ‘These results can be generalised to any sport or hobby.’

From AAMET quarterly journal, 2012

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